Blog of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research

Myrtle and MOOCs and More Weekend Links

July 26th, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling

ACA contraceptive coverage saves money, and more weekend links

July 19th, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling

Anatomically correct underpants
[via Tumblr user Slow]

  • I tracked these beautiful undies backwards through three layers of blogs and Tumblr sites, and even did a Google image search with the photo, but still couldn’t find where you can buy them.
  • Meet Cameron’s uterus, in Saturday Morning Cartoons at Autostraddle.
  • Japanese artist Megumi Igarashi has been arrested on suspicion of obscenity for distributing data that enables recipients to make 3D prints of her vulva. This happened in a country that resisted public pressure to ban pornographic images of children in manga comics and animated films. 
  • The Guttmacher Institute reports that the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive coverage guarantee, which requires most private insurance plans to cover contraception counseling, services, and supplies without additional out-of-pocket costs, ultimately saves money for businesses: The cost of contraception is outweighed by the savings from averting unplanned pregnancies.
  • This month, ladyblog The Hairpin  launched, “Bloodfeast” a new period foods-themed recipe column. The inaugural special is period burgers with Nutella

What does it really mean to be #LikeAGirl?

July 17th, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling

As published June 2014, Marie Claire, US edition

Always™ and its corporate owner, Procter & Gamble, have been receiving a lot of praise around the interwebs these days for their #LikeAGirl campaign, launched June 26, 2014, with a video produced by Lauren Greenfield. The video has been viewed 37 million times and counting. Last week, HuffPo actually called it “a game changer in feminist movement”, which I suppose reveals how little Huffington Post knows about feminist movements, more than anything else.

But before you applaud the efforts of Always to raise girls’ self-esteem, remember that they’re also the people who bring you these ads. Because that stench of girl never goes away, and you can’t spend all day in the shower, use Always.

Call for Menstruation & Reproductive Justice Visual Art

July 16th, 2014 by Saniya Lee Ghanoui

Guest Post by Jen Lewis

“Widening the Cycle: A Menstrual Art Exhibit”
Menstrual Health And Reproductive Justice: Human Rights Across The Lifespan

Submission Deadline: November 1, 2014 11:59PM (MST)
Exhibit Dates: June 4-6, 2015

Event Co-Sponsors, the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research (SMCR) and the Center for Women’s Health & Human Rights (CWHHR), seek visual art to enrich and further strengthen the multidisciplinary focus of the upcoming conference Menstrual Health and Reproductive Justice: Human Rights across the Lifespan. Art has the ability to challenge society’s deepest assumptions by sparking new ideas, catalyzing critical thinking, and inspiring individuals to take steps in new directions that facilitate social change. “Widening the Cycle” will explore visual art’s ability to alter social perceptions and reactions to menstruation with a particular interest in art created using menstrual fluid.

For more details, including eligibility and submission guidelines, please visit: http://www.beautyinblood.com/call-for-art.html

Remote-control contraceptives and more weekend links

July 12th, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling

Click twice to embiggen
[Infographic created by Kuhl Care]

 

The unpopular IUD and more weekend links

July 5th, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling
IUD in palm of woman's hand

Photo by Flickr user mara+
CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
January 5, 2010

Ms. July—Menstruation Pin-Up

July 4th, 2014 by Saniya Lee Ghanoui

Guest Post by Jen Lewis

Beauty in Blood Presents
Ms. July: Twists & Turns
Cycle: July 2013 
Menstrual Designer: Jen Lewis
Photographer: Rob Lewis

 

“Like a girl” and more weekend links

June 28th, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling

Moms and Menarche, and More Weekend Links

June 21st, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling

Obvious Child: The Other Taboo

June 18th, 2014 by Holly Grigg-Spall

cervical mucus

 The recently released rom-com ‘Obvious Child’ has been discussed far and wide for its mature, sensitive and funny approach to the topic of abortion and yet I have not seen one comment on the fact that this movie also makes mainstream (and yes, funny) the topic of cervical mucus.

In the opening scene stand-up comedian Donna (played by real-life comedian Jenny Slate) is performing on stage at her local open mic night. She wraps up with a joke about the state of her underwear and how, she describes, her underpants sometimes look like they have “crawled out of a tub of cream cheese.”

She claims that they often embarrass her by looking as such during sexual encounters, something she feels is not sexy.

Of course, by “cream cheese” I immediately assumed Donna meant cervical mucus. Unless she is supposed to have a vaginal infection – which seeing as it is not discussed amongst the other myriad bodily function-centric conversations in the movie, I doubt to be the case – then it’s clear she is detailing her experience of cervical mucus.

Later on that night, when Donna meets and goes home with a guy, has sex and then wakes up in bed with him the following morning, she sees that her underwear is laying next to the guy’s head on the pillow. Not only that, but this is one of those situations she finds embarrassing as the underwear is actually covered in the aforementioned “cream cheese” or cervical mucus. She cringes, retrieves the underwear and hastily puts it back on under the covers.

At this scene we can assume that the presence of visible cervical mucus indicates that the character is in fact fertile at this time during the movie. Even if we didn’t know this movie was about unplanned pregnancy, perhaps we would know now. Apparently Donna is not on hormonal birth control, and she’s not sure if, in their drunkenness, they used a condom properly. So, I speculate, if Donna had known she was fertile and that the “cream cheese” in her underwear was actually one of the handy signs of fertility her body provides, then she may have taken Plan B and not had to worry about an abortion. But, then, of course, we wouldn’t have had the rest of this movie. We would have had a very different movie – a movie someone should also make.

But it goes to show how some body literacy might go a long way in helping women make more informed choices. The abortion sets her back $500 and causes some emotional turmoil. A dose of Plan B is cheaper and easier to obtain, although not without some side effects. Maybe even, we can speculate, if Donna had known she was fertile she might have avoided PIV sex that night.

It’s great to see a movie approach the choice of abortion as though it really were, well, a choice. But isn’t it interesting that in doing so it shows how women can be hampered in their choices by a lack of body literacy?

We often see women in movies discussing their “fertile time” in regards to wanting to get pregnant – and so meeting their husbands to have sex at the optimum time in usually funny, crazy scenarios. Sometimes we have seen women taking their temperature or using ovulation tests and calendars to figure this out. However, I think this might be the first mention of cervical mucus in cinema.

I had the honor of seeing this movie with longtime abortion rights and women’s health activist Carol Downer and getting to discuss it with her after. Carol pioneered the self-help movement and self-examination, adding much to our collective knowledge of our bodies.  

This is what she had to say:

Save the Date! The Next Great Menstrual Health Con

June 16th, 2014 by Chris Bobel

New material for condoms, birth control controversies, and more weekend links

June 14th, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling

Readers should note that statements published in re: Cycling are those of individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the positions of the Society as a whole.