Blog of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research

Ms. September – Menstruation Pin-Up

September 2nd, 2015 by Jen Lewis
Beauty in Blood Presents
Ms. September: Let It Flow #2
Year: 2015
Menstrual Designer: Jen Lewis
Photographer: Rob Lewis

A cha cha about menstrual products, and other menstrual poetry open mic originals.

August 31st, 2015 by Editor

#SMCR2015 Plenary Session Video Presentation

Menstrual Poetry Open Mic

Menstrual educator and activist Chella Quint, center, teaches the audience the Menstrual Products Cha Cha at #SMCR2015 Open Mic.

The 21st Biennial Conference of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research at The Center for Women’s Health and Human Rights, June 4-6, 2015, Suffolk University, Boston concluded on Saturday night, June 6th, with a menstrual poetry open mic. Local slam poets joined SMCR members for an evening of spoken word performances about menstrual realities: big, small, old and new. Performers explored the multiple dimensions of our messy, wondrous and vexing bodies, our sexualities, genders, health and our feminisms. The event was hosted and kicked off by Janae Johnson, a Boston area spoken word poet, teaching artist, educator and winner of the 2015 Women of the World Poetry Slam.

Click on the arrow, sit back and enjoy a unique, free-wheeling, all-welcome evening of spoken word performances.

Videography provided by courtesy of Robert Lewis.

Mainstreaming Menstruation: A Scholar’s Journey to Advocacy and Education

August 24th, 2015 by Laura Wershler

#SMCR2015 Plenary Session Video Presentation

Mainstreaming the Flow: (Still) Selling My Soul to Start the Conversation

Keynote Address by Tomi-Ann Roberts, PhD, to the 21st Biennial Conference of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research, Friday, June 5th, 2015, Boston, MA

“I want to bring menstruation out of the closet.”

In this presentation Tomi-Ann Roberts, a professor of psychology at Colorado College, talks about her efforts at “mainstreaming the flow” and presents some of the many challenges and satisfactions of moving from scholar to advocate and educator for non-academic audiences on the connections between objectification, sexualization, and menstrual wellness. Hear how she addressed the “thigh gap” controversy in a blog post for teenage girls in her role as a U by Kotex advocate, while at the same time worrying that she is giving girls ideas for self-objectification. Learn how she is contributing to a class action legal case on behalf of incarcerated women that is arguing for menstrual privacy as a civil right, yet concerned that she might be reifying negative attitudes and emotions about menstruation. Robert’s journey from scholar to advocate to educator demonstrates the power of a “shared voice” to demystify and destigmatize menstruation.

Videography provided courtesy of Robert Lewis.

Award-winning menstrual cycle advocacy and research

August 17th, 2015 by Laura Wershler

#SMCR2015 Plenary Session Video Presentation

Making Menstruation Matter Award, Student Awards and the Mary Anna Friederich Service Award

Presented at the 21st Biennial Conference of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research at The Center for Women’s Health and Human Rights, held June 4-6, 2015, at Suffolk University in Boston, MA.

Awards Coordinator Mindy Erchull hosted the 2015 SMCR awards ceremony on Saturday, June 6th, 2015.

Student awards are given to either undergraduate or graduate students who present high quality research at the conference. Amy Dryden received the Linda McKeever Award and Saniya Ghanoui the Esther Rome Award.

Two long-time SMCR members–Joan Chrisler and Elizabeth Kissling–were honored with the Mary Anna Friederich Service Award for their outstanding and unusual service contributions to the Society.

Veteran women’s health advocate Judy Norsigian accepted the Making Menstruation Matter Award on behalf of the Boston-based organization  Our Bodies Ourselves. A non-profit, public interest organization most recently based in Cambridge, MA, USA, OBOS develops and promotes evidence-based information on girls’ and women’s reproductive health and sexuality. Their landmark publication, Our Bodies Ourselves, has sold millions of copies around the world and has been translated into more than two dozen languages.

Working in collaboration with U.S. and global organizations, in more than 30 countries, OBOS vigorously advocates for women’s health by challenging institutions and systems that devalue women and prevent them from having full control over their bodies and their health.

The Society for Menstrual Cycle Research honors this group for these efforts and, in particular, their pioneering historic work around improving femcare product safety and menstrual health and awareness more generally.

Videography courtesy of Rob Lewis.

Respect for Menstruation is a Human Right

August 13th, 2015 by Laura Wershler

#SMCR2015 Plenary Session Video Presentation

Keynote by Loretta J. Ross, Reproductive Justice Pioneer

Presented at the 21st Biennial Conference of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research at The Center for Women’s Health and Human Rights, held June 4-6, 2015, at Suffolk University in Boston, MA.

“I tend to think of reproductive justice as a promiscuous concept that will have sex with any idea that looks like it’s going to protect women’s human rights.”

Speaking at the SMCR conference on Menstrual Health and Reproductive Justice on June 5th , 2015, Loretta J. Ross addresses how women and girls can celebrate their bodies, especially their menses, instead of being shamed and hidden as in most cultures. Building on the experiences learned at the Black Women’s Health Imperative and using the human rights framework, Ross talks about how activists are changing the conversation about menstruation and womanhood.

Loretta J. Ross is an expert on women’s issues, hate groups, racism and intolerance, human rights, and violence against women. Her work focuses on the intersectionality of social justice issues an dhow this affects social change and service delivery in all movements. She was a co-founder and the national coordinator of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective from 2005-2012, a network founded in 1997 by women of color and allied organizations that organize women of color in the reproductive justice movement. She was also a national co-director of the April 25, 2004 March for Women’s Lives in Washington, D.C., the largest protest march in U.S. history with more than one million participants, and the founder and executive director of the National Center for Human Rights Education (NCHRE) in Atlanta, Georgia.

Videography provided courtesy of Robert Lewis.

Menstrual Hygiene Management: A Global Panel Discussion

August 6th, 2015 by Laura Wershler

#SMCR 2015 Plenary Session Video Presentation:

“Menstrual health is like the rhino for ecology, it’s the thing that if we get wrong the whole ecosystem fails. And if we get menstrual health wrong the social ecosystem fails.”  

Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) is critically neglected in development programs leading to negative cascading effects, particularly for girls, in health, education, safety and productivity. This plenary session was presented at the 21st Biennial Conference of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research on June 4th, 2015, in Boston, MA. A global first, the panel brought together activists, practitioners, funders and academics to share their unique work and discuss barriers and opportunities to form a global, lasting movement to mainstream menstruation management.

Moderator:
Megan White Mukuria  (ZanaAfrica)

Panelists:
Leeat Weinstock (Grand Challenges Canada),
Sinu Joseph (Myrthi),
Murat Sahin (WASH in Schools, UNICEF),
Archana Patkar (Water Supply and Sanitation Coordinating Council),
Beverly Mademba (WASH United)

 

Call for abstracts for the upcoming virtual MHM conference on October 22, 2015:

Ms. August – Menstruation Pin-Up

August 5th, 2015 by Jen Lewis

Guest Post by Jen Lewis

Beauty in Blood Presents
Ms. August: A Beautiful Bloody Dance
Year: 2015
Menstrual Designer: Jen Lewis
Photographer: Rob Lewis

Flibanserin is NOT “female Viagra” and here’s why

July 30th, 2015 by Laura Wershler

If you’ve been hearing about the “female Viagra” drug Flibanserin in the media over the past couple of months and wonder what it’s all about, Dr. Aaron Carroll at Healthcare Triage sets the record straight and tells you everything you need to know about Flibanserin in this seven-minute video.

To quote Dr. Carroll, “The two drugs aren’t even close to the same thing.” He asks the media and others to stop calling Flibanserin the “female Viagra.” He says, “It makes pharmacology nerds very, very unhappy when you do that.”

#noboozewithflib

For one, Viagra is taken on an as needed basis and does not work if the man is not already sexually aroused. Flibanserin is intended for daily use by premenopausal women and affects the brain, supposedly, to increase feelings of sexual desire. Side effects include, says Dr Carroll, “marked sedation, somnolence and fatigue,” and are made worse in those who consume alcohol.

The video provides need-to-know information because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is leaning towards approving Flibanserin this summer. Though twice rejected by the FDA, an aggressive public relations campaign spearheaded by drug owner Sprout Pharmaceuticals has resulted in a recommendation to the FDA to approve the drug with risk management options. A letter to the FDA signed by Leonore Tiefer, PhD, of the New View Campaign and over 100 other concerned health experts, sex researchers and clinicians urging them to reject approval of flibanserin explains the many problems with the drug. Here’s what the letter says about Flibanserin and alcohol:

We will leave the topic of flibanserin’s safety to others, except for mentioning the truly absurd situation of approving a daily drug to boost the sex lives of women in their 30s and 40s that must not be taken with alcohol. As sexologists we can say with confidence that this advice is both preposterous and doomed.

The New View Campaign also wrote a song advocating that women and the FDA Throw That Pink Pill Away:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Society for Menstrual Cycle Research added its voice to those opposing FDA approval of Flibanserin by passing the following resolution in June at its 2015 Biennial conference in Boston, MA:

The Society for Menstrual Cycle Research regrets the recommendation by the Bone, Reproductive, and Urologic Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee on June 4, 2015 that Flibanserin be approved with risk management options. The discussion after the vote was recorded made it clear that even those in favor had serious reservations about the efficacy and safety of the drug. We believe that women want safe and effective options, not unsafe and ineffective medications. Therefore, we urge the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to override the Advisory Committees’ decision and reject this drug.

NOTE: This post was updated on July 30, 2015 at 12:55 p.m. EST with the addition of the song.

Menstrual Prose Poem from #SMCR2015: “My feet flow through each cycle.”

July 20th, 2015 by Laura Wershler

On June 6th, 2015, at the 21st Biennial Conference of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research at the Centre for Women’s Health and Human Rights in Boston, conference participants celebrated with an Open Mic evening of Menstrual Poetry to close out #SMCR2015. This is the last in a series of posts at re:Cycling that aims to give a broader audience to some of the poetry performed that evening.

 

Flow – by Rosie Sheb’a

Sustainable Cycles cyclists Rachel, Olive and Rosie in Atlanta, Georgia, en route to the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research conference held in Boston, June 4-6, 2015.

Flow. My feet flow through each cycle. Every revolution takes me further into the cycle. Life cycle. Bicycle. Upcycle. Recycle.

My small wheels move along the road, a mirror to the larger wheel of which I am a tiny, insignificant, and yet pivotal part. My essence is essential to the whole. The microcosm of my womb reflects the entire universe!

I look at my legs powering my bicycle across state after state. I watch as I bleed and listen to my body as my ovulation is reflected by the road. My menstrual cycle is a perfect replica of the seasons, of the stages from egg to caterpillar, to pupa, to butterfly. The Earth rotates around the sun, just as my pedals rotate around my crank shaft, and foot by foot, mile by mile, I move forward. We move forward. Propelled by our destiny as cyclists. Life Cyclists.

We cycle, and millennia of oppression melts away. We are part of something immense. Individually, we are just a tiny cog in the giant clock of evolution, but together, we can say menstruation. Period. I bleed. You bleed. We were, are and will be bleeders. Without our blood, life as we know it would not be. Cycling, together, we conquer fear. We surmount shame.

Sustainable cycles? It’s a pun about bikes and periods, but it’s so much more than that. Our message is clear. Love your cycle. Love the cycle. Take care of yourself, and you take care of the planet. Learn about your body, and you will be empowered.

I watch a teenage girl ride her bike through the streets of Philadelphia. Will she have knowledge of her cycle?

I see an old woman on a park bench in New Orleans. Who is learning her life lessons?

A middle aged dame in Texas tells me she doesn’t like “that word” and I wonder. Does her daughter know her – Period?

A transgender man tells of his forgotten tablets and using soft leaves to soak up his accidental summer-camp flow.

So many perspectives from so many places and we’ve only just scratched the surface. So many lessons to learn from our neighbours. Collectively, we have a purpose.

Learn to love. Love to grow as our cycle continues. I watch a playground of children. What world can we envision for them?

A world where we know our bodies? Where we can be ourselves without fear?

A world void of hatred?

Who knows. I am but a tiny wheel on the cycle of life.

Yet one small action can trigger a revolution.

One cycle. One. Cycle. We are in it.

Where do you want to go?

Rosie Sheba is the owner/director of Sustainable Menstruation Australia and rode from Austin to Boston with Sustainable Cycles to present at #SMCR2015. She has a background in evolutionary biology and ecology. Rosie sees positive relationships and experiences of the menstrual cycle as the keystone for the evolutionary survival and success of humanity.

A doc about birth control, #LiveTweetYourPeriod, and other 4th of July weekend links

July 4th, 2015 by Laura Wershler
  • It’s old news that men find women’s faces more attractive when they are fertile, but the facial cues to explain this have eluded researchers. A new study from the University of Cambridge, as reported in the Science Daily, shows that women’s face skin gets redder at the point of peak fertility. However, as this change in face redness is too subtle for the human eye to detect, skin colouration has been ruled out as the reason for this “attractiveness effect.” Dr. Hannah Rowland, who co-led the study, said, “Women don’t advertise ovulation, but they do seem to leak information about it, as studies have shown they are seen as more attractive by men when ovulating.” The mystery continues.

When Elynn Walter walks into a room of officials from global health organizations and governments, this is how she likes to get their attention:

“I’ll say, ‘OK, everyone stand up and yell the word blood!’ or say, ‘Half of the people in the world have their period!’ ”

It’s her way of getting people talking about a topic that a lot of people, well, aren’t comfortable talking about: menstrual hygiene.

Readers should note that statements published in re: Cycling are those of individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the positions of the Society as a whole.