Blog of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research

Women’s Need for Accurate Information About Birth Control Gets Lost in Controversy over Zimbabwe Official’s Speech About Dangers of Birth Control

July 18th, 2014 by Saniya Lee Ghanoui

Guest Post by Carol Downer

One side of the population controller establishment, the “pro-natalist”, says they’re concerned about our health, when, in reality, they just want us to have more babies; the other side, the “anti-natalists”, says they’re concerned about our health when, in reality, they want us to have fewer babies. Who’s “facts” do we believe?  Or, whether we believe their facts or not, do we believe they’re concerned about our health, or that they’re cloaking their national and international policy debates about the impact of birth rates on national aspirations or economic growth in the neutral garb of a discussion about women’s health.

A recent flurry of supposedly neutral health discussions and commentary was provoked when a pro-natalist Zimbabwean official told his countrywomen “to multiply” in order to be a “superpower” and warns that birth control can cause cancer, a supposedly objective “fact checker group”, Africa Check, rushed to allay women’s fears about oral contraceptives and cancer, and Bustle.Com chimes in support.

Africa Check wrote a critical article about two main assertions by Zimbabwe Official Tobaiwa Mudede on May 25 at the celebration of Africa Day. It ignored his first assertion that the promotion of birth control is a ploy by western nations to retard population growth in Africa, and then it found that when he says that contraceptives can cause cancer, his facts are right, however his advice to women to stop using contraceptives were “misleading and alarmist”.

They rely on WHO’s cancer and research agency, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), who confirmed that there can be a link between the use of oral and injectable hormonal contraceptives and particular types of cancer, increasing the risk in some cases and lowering it in others. Dr. Elvira Singh of IARC concluded that Mudede’s comments are “alarmist”.

Shortly thereafter, Abby Johnston of Bustle.com, sums up the WHO’s position as “the benefit far exceeds the risks” with contraceptive use, and mis-quotes Africa Check in saying that “the higher the birth rate in a country, the higher the maternal mortality rate”. Fact? Africa Check said that the UN only said the dangers of having more children could result in increased mortality rate. Johnston reveals her true concern, which is that African women are having too many babies in her statement, “Access and education on birth control is particularly important in areas facing overpopulation.”  She presumably means Africa. African women, just as much as other women, need to have an unbiased comparison of all methods of birth control; www.birth-control-comparison.info

Methinks that the reason that Africa Check didn’t check the facts concerning Mudede’s allegation that “there are those in the West that push birth control is because they fear population growth in Africa” is based on fact, as the Bustle.com article reveals.

There isn’t much written about or by the population control establishment for the general reader. (There is an extensive scientific literature published by demographers -demography is the study of populations, including birth control, migration and immigration). I urge supporters of women’s reproductive rights to read “Quiverfull” by Kathryn Joyce, a contributing reporter for Nation Magazine. Joyce gives a road map to the Christian Patriarchy Movement” in America that forms the popular base for the pro-natalist politicians. Given the tidal wave of T.R.A.P. laws (Targeting Abortion Regulation Providers) in various states, and the recent Supreme Court decisions that promise to sharply restrict accessibility of abortion, I think it is important for us to face the influence of the growing pro-natalist movement in the United States. At the same time, I think we need similar research and analysis of the antinatalist movement, both national and international, who oppose it. My review of Quiverfull is at femwords.blogspot.com.

  

What does it really mean to be #LikeAGirl?

July 17th, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling

As published June 2014, Marie Claire, US edition

Always™ and its corporate owner, Procter & Gamble, have been receiving a lot of praise around the interwebs these days for their #LikeAGirl campaign, launched June 26, 2014, with a video produced by Lauren Greenfield. The video has been viewed 37 million times and counting. Last week, HuffPo actually called it “a game changer in feminist movement”, which I suppose reveals how little Huffington Post knows about feminist movements, more than anything else.

But before you applaud the efforts of Always to raise girls’ self-esteem, remember that they’re also the people who bring you these ads. Because that stench of girl never goes away, and you can’t spend all day in the shower, use Always.

  

Call for Menstruation & Reproductive Justice Visual Art

July 16th, 2014 by Saniya Lee Ghanoui

Guest Post by Jen Lewis

“Widening the Cycle: A Menstrual Art Exhibit”
Menstrual Health And Reproductive Justice: Human Rights Across The Lifespan

Submission Deadline: November 1, 2014 11:59PM (MST)
Exhibit Dates: June 4-6, 2015

Event Co-Sponsors, the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research (SMCR) and the Center for Women’s Health & Human Rights (CWHHR), seek visual art to enrich and further strengthen the multidisciplinary focus of the upcoming conference Menstrual Health and Reproductive Justice: Human Rights across the Lifespan. Art has the ability to challenge society’s deepest assumptions by sparking new ideas, catalyzing critical thinking, and inspiring individuals to take steps in new directions that facilitate social change. “Widening the Cycle” will explore visual art’s ability to alter social perceptions and reactions to menstruation with a particular interest in art created using menstrual fluid.

For more details, including eligibility and submission guidelines, please visit: http://www.beautyinblood.com/call-for-art.html

  

Remote-control contraceptives and more weekend links

July 12th, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling

Click twice to embiggen
[Infographic created by Kuhl Care]

 

  

The unpopular IUD and more weekend links

July 5th, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling
IUD in palm of woman's hand

Photo by Flickr user mara+
CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
January 5, 2010

  

Ms. July—Menstruation Pin-Up

July 4th, 2014 by Saniya Lee Ghanoui

Guest Post by Jen Lewis

Beauty in Blood Presents
Ms. July: Twists & Turns
Cycle: July 2013 
Menstrual Designer: Jen Lewis
Photographer: Rob Lewis

 

  

“Like a girl” and more weekend links

June 28th, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling
  

Menstrual History Research

June 23rd, 2014 by David Linton

A noteworthy addition to the menstrual canon was published last year by Sara Read, a professor in the Department of English and Drama at Loughborough University in England, titled Menstruation and the Female Body in Early Modern England (Palgrave Macmillan). As the title suggests, the book delves into the menstrual ecology of 16th and 17th Century England in order to discover the nature of attitudes and practices of the time. Given the fact that the prejudices, myths, taboos, and emphasis on discretion and even secrecy were present as they are today (though sometimes taking different forms), it is a daunting challenge to unearth evidence of how the menstrual cycle was viewed centuries in the past. However, despite the secrecy surrounding the topic, Read has unearthed nearly 150 primary sources ranging from journals, sermons and letters to midwife instructional manuals which she subjects to close analysis assisted by more than 100 secondary scholarly references. In doing so she has revealed a complex set of social practices and has critiqued them with insight.

There is a striking symmetry between Sara Read’s documentation of Early Modern menstruation and Lauren Rosewarne’s Periods in Pop Culture (Lexington Books) published the previous year. Though they examine eras separated by 400 to 500 years of history and vast changes in practices and attitudes, their projects compliment each other in surprisingly felicitous ways. Both authors capture the nuances of the subject in their respective realms and invite readers to think more deeply about how menstrual values are formed.

Following the publication of Read’s book, she is one of the organizers of a conference in July at her home university titled “Early Modern Women, Religion, and the Body” that will include several presentations with menstrual themes, including my own paper titled, “The Early Modern ‘Period’ and Biblical Stories of Menstruating Women.” A report on the conference will be posted after its completion.

  

Moms and Menarche, and More Weekend Links

June 21st, 2014 by Elizabeth Kissling
  

Obvious Child: The Other Taboo

June 18th, 2014 by Holly Grigg-Spall

cervical mucus

 The recently released rom-com ‘Obvious Child’ has been discussed far and wide for its mature, sensitive and funny approach to the topic of abortion and yet I have not seen one comment on the fact that this movie also makes mainstream (and yes, funny) the topic of cervical mucus.

In the opening scene stand-up comedian Donna (played by real-life comedian Jenny Slate) is performing on stage at her local open mic night. She wraps up with a joke about the state of her underwear and how, she describes, her underpants sometimes look like they have “crawled out of a tub of cream cheese.”

She claims that they often embarrass her by looking as such during sexual encounters, something she feels is not sexy.

Of course, by “cream cheese” I immediately assumed Donna meant cervical mucus. Unless she is supposed to have a vaginal infection – which seeing as it is not discussed amongst the other myriad bodily function-centric conversations in the movie, I doubt to be the case – then it’s clear she is detailing her experience of cervical mucus.

Later on that night, when Donna meets and goes home with a guy, has sex and then wakes up in bed with him the following morning, she sees that her underwear is laying next to the guy’s head on the pillow. Not only that, but this is one of those situations she finds embarrassing as the underwear is actually covered in the aforementioned “cream cheese” or cervical mucus. She cringes, retrieves the underwear and hastily puts it back on under the covers.

At this scene we can assume that the presence of visible cervical mucus indicates that the character is in fact fertile at this time during the movie. Even if we didn’t know this movie was about unplanned pregnancy, perhaps we would know now. Apparently Donna is not on hormonal birth control, and she’s not sure if, in their drunkenness, they used a condom properly. So, I speculate, if Donna had known she was fertile and that the “cream cheese” in her underwear was actually one of the handy signs of fertility her body provides, then she may have taken Plan B and not had to worry about an abortion. But, then, of course, we wouldn’t have had the rest of this movie. We would have had a very different movie – a movie someone should also make.

But it goes to show how some body literacy might go a long way in helping women make more informed choices. The abortion sets her back $500 and causes some emotional turmoil. A dose of Plan B is cheaper and easier to obtain, although not without some side effects. Maybe even, we can speculate, if Donna had known she was fertile she might have avoided PIV sex that night.

It’s great to see a movie approach the choice of abortion as though it really were, well, a choice. But isn’t it interesting that in doing so it shows how women can be hampered in their choices by a lack of body literacy?

We often see women in movies discussing their “fertile time” in regards to wanting to get pregnant – and so meeting their husbands to have sex at the optimum time in usually funny, crazy scenarios. Sometimes we have seen women taking their temperature or using ovulation tests and calendars to figure this out. However, I think this might be the first mention of cervical mucus in cinema.

I had the honor of seeing this movie with longtime abortion rights and women’s health activist Carol Downer and getting to discuss it with her after. Carol pioneered the self-help movement and self-examination, adding much to our collective knowledge of our bodies.  

This is what she had to say:

The contraceptive doctor–patient disconnect

June 17th, 2014 by Saniya Lee Ghanoui

Guest Post by Jennifer Aldoretta

There seems to be a growing disconnect in recent years between physicians and their patients, and women are especially susceptible to this given our reliance on doctors for information about contraception. When compared to the questions many of us ask our doctors, the information we receive isn’t always up to snuff.

Patient autonomy, as defined by medical dictionaries, is “the right of patients to make decisions about their medical care without their healthcare provider trying to influence the decision.” Based on many conversations with other women, in addition to my own personal experiences, patient autonomy often does not exist for women seeking information about contraception. And this is a huge problem. Deadly (and rare) birth control side effects have become a hot-topic in the news as of late – which is likely contributing to this physician–patient disconnect – but the growing patient interest in control and autonomy means that this cannot simply be dismissed as a side effect of the media.

A recent study, published in the Journal of Contraception, asked both women and healthcare providers to rank the importance of 34 questions relating to contraceptive options. They found that the things that are most important to women are often not as important to their healthcare providers. For example, knowing exactly how a method works to prevent pregnancy was ranked by women as the most important piece of information, whereas how to use a method correctly topped the list for providers. Effectiveness, while still important, was ranked fifth by women, which is a stark inconsistency if you consider just how central a method’s effectiveness is in ads and in the media. The study also found that questions regarding potential side effects ranked in the top three for 26% of women, but only 16% of providers.

These stats may seem inconsequential – after all, physicians should be educating patients about proper use of contraceptive methods. But here’s the problem: the methods suggested by physicians don’t always align with a woman’s stated preferences. I’m certain I’m not the only woman who has been pressured to use a hormonal method (despite my voiced concerns) simply because these methods are considered to be easy and effective. While it seems like a logical solution for physicians to advocate for hormonal methods over methods with higher typical-use failure rates, this approach is ultimately a detriment to women.

A growing number of women seem to be turning to withdrawal, and while this isn’t inherently bad, it becomes bad when a patient isn’t educated on how to properly use it simply because her physician is hesitant to discuss “unreliable” methods. This means that women are turning to potentially unreliable internet sources (or, worse, misinformed friends) for this information. The same can be said for diaphragms, cervical caps, and fertility awareness-based methods. If we want to continue to drive down unintended pregnancy rates, dismissing patient concerns and eliminating patient autonomy isn’t the route we should take. Contraceptive methods aren’t one-size-fits-all, which should be obvious by the huge differences in side effects experienced from person to person. So why do so many contraceptive consultations continue to be carried out in this one-size-fits-all fashion?

Empowering women through family planning is more complex than simply prescribing the most effective methods. It must be coupled with engagement in an open dialogue, including acknowledgement of patient concerns and a respect for patient autonomy. Patients are increasingly demanding autonomy, and if healthcare providers wish to remain a respected part of a woman’s health, it’s time to set aside contraceptive biases and listen.

  

Save the Date! The Next Great Menstrual Health Con

June 16th, 2014 by Chris Bobel

  
Readers should note that statements published in re: Cycling are those of individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the positions of the Society as a whole.