Blog of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research

It Is Gross, but Why Is It Gross? Adventures in Grossland

October 28th, 2013 by Chris Bobel

For me, that’s always the question.

Gross is a decision. It is a judgment based on a set of values derived from a particular perspective. And because of this slipperiness, some things are more widely deemed GROSS that some other things.

Readers of this blog are well aware that bleeding lady parts often end up in Grossland. And they end up there more often than other body parts doing their body part thing. So why is this?

It’s been a busy few weeks in Grossland— dizzying days upon days of seeing the obvious contradictions embedded in what we, as a culture, deem gross and what we see as just- bodies- being- natural-bodies. Sometimes these bodily functions are FUNNY and other times only mildly yucky, but still okay to talk about.And sometimes, in the case of menstruating bodies, we are socialized to keep the whole thing quiet and hidden.

My most recent trip to Grossland began with the uproar over the newly-released (and nearly sold out) American Apparel masturbation-period-vulva T shirt flap. The flap just barely died down when Kristen Schaal’s brilliant satire (on the Daily Show with Jon Stewart) delivered a bit on the proliferation of sexy Halloween costumes for women. In it, Schaal suggested that women “take it to the next level … get everyone thinking about sex (by) dressing up as the place where sex happens!” (and in walks a 6 foot high vulva! With Stewart-as-straight-man remarking “I don’t know if we can show that….” )I love what she did there, but the piece is not ONLY funny for its feminist take down of the hypersexualization of women’s bodies. The costume is outrageous because it  is gross, right? “Sexy Vagina” (vulva, of course, more accurately, but this is not the time for anatomical correctness)  is funny because who-in-their-right-mind-would dress-up-like-that?  That’s disgusting. Welcome to Grossland.

Petra Collins, the 20-year-old artist commissioned to produce the t-shirt image for no-friend-to-women retailer American Apparel gets this (even if her check was written by a corporate entity who could care less about the social message she has in mind). Collins speaks compellingly about the objectification and containment of women’s bodies that her work endeavors to challenge. And she reports that the controversy swirling around a line drawing of a hand stroking a menstruating (and hairy!!!) vulva was “awesome” because

“it totally proves my point…. that we’re so shocked and appalled at something that’s such a natural state—and its funny that out of all the images everywhere, all of the sexually violent images, or disgustingly derogatory images, this is something that’s so, so shocking apparently.”

And appalled we are! One commenter on a TIME article about the t shirt controversy remarked: I….would equate her imagery with a straining rectum expelling a painful, post-digestion steak dinner.” And there it is. We can’t seem to have a menstrual moment without someone rushing in to equate menstruation with defecation. Liz Kissling has taken it on. Breanne Fahs has, too, more recently, but we still haven’t gained much traction in showing that

1) menstruating and pooping are not the same thing, and even if they were,

2) menstruating IS  more shamed than pooping

Menstruation is gross (throw in masturbation and pubes to make it really beyond the pale) because we say it is. And those that hasten  to compare uterine-lining shining with expelling feces are missing the fact that while the processes do overlap in some ways, we are NOT, culturally speaking, as hellbent on silencing the poop (or the farts and certainly not the piss) as we are the menses.  and why is that? Perhaps it it matters who is doing the business.  I assert that it ain’t no coincidence that  bleeding LADY parts are the Grossest of Them All.

To wit, I submit the following:

A colleague put the new film Movie 43, a blend of edgy and puerile vignettes acted by a star studded ensemble cast, on my radar. The film includes the segment: “Middleschool Date” (written by Elizabeth Shapiro. Elizabeth: If you are out there, will you be my friend?).

Amanda (Chloë Grace Moretz) discovers she just got her first period and tries to hide it, but when Nathan (Jimmy Bennett) sees blood on her pants, he panics and kicks immediately into naïve crisis mode, abetted by his older brother, Mikey (Christopher Mintz-Plasse) who races around the kitchen in search of suitable plugs (he produces a purple kitchen sponge at one point and a Swiffer© mop. Painfully ignorant Nathan is sure Amanda is wounded…lethally. Then When Dad (Patrick Warburton) enters:

Mikey, hysterical: Nathan’s date is on her period for the first time and she is bleeding EVERYWHERE!

Dad: …ugh…disgusting…I mean…congratulations.

Soon, Amanda’s Dad (Matt Walsh) arrives. He is disgusted by periods too, of course, and says so, though under his breath.

Ultimately, Amanda takes control by normalizing the situation and calling out the craziness (“I am just a regular seventh-grade girl getting her period and it really sucks that I had to be in front of you idiots”). Amanda and her disgusting leaky body leaves and order is restored. Dad plays “pull my finger” with Nathan who admiringly praises his Dad’s resulting “epic” fart and Mikey announces he is off to take “a massive dump” to the thumbs up of little brother.

And scene. A succinct illustration of the double standard. Menstruation: terrifying, mysterious and disgusting. Farting and pooping: just boys and men doing what they do. Bodies in their natural states. Nothing gross here.

Grossland is a strange place.

  

4 Responses to “It Is Gross, but Why Is It Gross? Adventures in Grossland”

  1. Laura Wershler says:

    Great analysis as usual, Chris. Love Amanda’s punchline.

  2. Chris Bobel says:

    Thanks, Laura. And just now, I caught the Charmin commerical with the tag line “Enjoy the Go!” I know that one of the major femcare companys launched their “Have a Happy Period” campaign several years ago—but somehow, I don’ think they are comparable, not really. For Charmin, there are cute colorful cartoon bears and “enjoying the go” means appreciating alone time, texting on the toliet, finding relief (sez the bears). Don’t think the Happy Period inspired the same benefits. The line, for femcare, was more tongue in cheek, wasn’t it?

  3. Jennifer says:

    Omg! This is so funny and TRUE! I broke the poo barrier with my boyfriend so we talk about it but the period barrier?! Yeah right! In general though the whole not talking about your period is changing. :)

  4. Chris Bobel says:

    I do hope you are right, Jennifer!
    Thanks for commenting.

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